#12 Enjoyment: The Origination of Film

To round out our first 8 weeks of campaigning, here at Band Wagon, in light of the major issues and relevant topics we have covered, we are going to address the major overarching question within the modern cinematic industry. Effectively, we are asking the top tier of our campaign questioning: how do movie critics and moviegoers view films differently?

There is a very detailed and effective article at online publication website The Artifice that in summation differentiates the average viewer from the professional critic by stating the the critics are instead silent observers, where “their critical opinions speak much louder than the average persons.” Subsequently, it can be argued that you as the average viewer or citizen (by which we are by no means suggesting you or your critical opinions are average), can be instead comparatively the opposite, where your judgements and enjoyment may run rampant within the film viewing, but instead due to your unheard voice, lay silent in the world of critical opinion. It is a modern perspective that film critics view films in a light of ‘professional’ film standards, as opposed to your intentions which lie much more in the field of entertainment value. However, is this difference merely by which we should devalue your voice in the modern cinematic industry? Although the average moviegoer and the professional film critic hence have largely different viewing perspectives and standards upon by which they judge a film, this is just the means by which Band Wagon support a raise in the appreciation of the average moviegoer, as it gives the modern cinematic industry a larger means by which to evaluate its content. Especially in the earliest forms of film, where enjoyment was the standard by which films were primarily judged, then wouldn’t modern cinema appreciate judgement not only through a medium professional standard, but a medium that originates in the very origination of film: entertainment value. It appears that only you as the average moviegoer can provide this judgement, and this cannot go understated.

Even so, as The Artifice explores in it’s in-depth article, even professional critics judging by similar professional standards arrive at discrepancies in their opinion and cinematic review. If this by fact is the case, then perhaps it is time to consider yourselves as the professional critics too, by which you are simply judging the modern cinematic industry by a varying set of ‘professional’ standards to the professional critics. And, if you ask any of our editors here at Band Wagon or the modern majority populace, it is the standard of enjoyment that stands superior above all else in the cinematic industry, especially in relation to important outcomes such as revenue and filmic reach.

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To return to our origins, we understand that all humans are subject to their own opinions, but you as members of the public deserve to freely express and gather your own evaluation, regardless of differentiating perspectives. Better yet, we believe that it is your citizen opinion that should be heard, in order to more accurately and respectively judge the reaction of the general public toward a film, therefore creating an even, fair and respected playing field for all projects within the modern cinematic industry. It is time that the modern cinematic was judged by the majority, as opposed to the minority. This campaign is the only Band Wagon you should be jumping on. Don’t be intimidated to jump on the singular critical opinion of a minority, feel free to drive your own, and enjoy!

#dontjumpdrive

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